Little Lou's Sayings and Doings by Elizabeth Payson Prentiss

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Elizabeth Payson Prentiss
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Little Lou's Sayings and Doings

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Book review

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ... "What is a dragon, mama? Does he drag?" "Who has been talking to you about dragons?" "Nobody. I heard papa read in the Bible at prayers about a great red dragon that had seven heads, and ten horns, and ten crowns upon his heads." "Then if you heard about it from papa you had better ask him whatever you want to know. For my part, I never saw a dragon, and never want to see one. Now, darling, you really must not ask me another question, just now." chapter xvii. gjjguite early in the winter, Lou was sitting in a ikjaji high chair near the window, when his papa came in from the Post-office with the letters and papers. One letter was from Uncle Henry. Mama read it to herself first, and then she ran to Lou and kissed him, and said, " God has sent a little baby to Aunt Fanny. It is your cousin, and I hope you will love it very much." "Ah! what is it?" asked papa. "A boy or a girl?" "It it a girl, and it is to be called Fanny, for its grandmama." "How did God get it to Aunt Fanny?" asked Lou. "Did it come flying softly down, like a snowflake? How funny it would look to see the air full of little babies all flying down together!" "When it is, I shall go out and catch one," said mama. "I would catch a little sister for you. Aunt Fanny sends her love to you, and says she wishes you could see her baby." "Can I go there?" cried Lou, jumping down from his chair. "Not to-day. I hope Aunt Fanny will bring it here next spring." "Well," he said, in a joyful voice. "And I'll lend her my little hatchet." "Oh, girls don't care for hatchets." "Do they care for wheelbarrows?" "Not much." "What sort of things are girls, then? I don't believe they have much sense." "Little girls are quieter than boys. They like to play with dolls, and make believe they are live...

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